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INTERNAL CONFLICTS IN MYANMAR

• The internal conflict in Myanmar (also known as Burma) refers to fighting between government
soldiers and rebels in Myanmar
• started shortly after the country separated from the United Kingdom in 1948
• The government of Myanmar has fought different rebel groups from different ethnic minorities
KAREN CONFLICT

• Karen Conflict has been described as one of the world's "longest running civil wars
• It is an ongoing armed conflict in Myanmar (Burma) and is a part of the internal conflict in Myanmar
• The Karen nationalist movement has been fighting for more autonomy and/or independence within
Burma
• The Karen people have been fighting for an independent Karen state since 1949
RELIGIOUS AND ETHNIC CONFLICTS

• The tragedy of the Rohingya


the ethno-religious conflict between the Buddhist majority and the Muslim minority of the Rohingya
has escalated since 2016
• Why so much hate of the Rohingya?
“kill and bury” , such sentiments and outright discrimination of the Rohingya people can be traced to
the long history of ethno-religious tensions in Rakhine
• All quiet on the eastern front?
Aung San Suu Kyi declared that her first priority would be to negotiate a lasting peace
• The Road to Peace
The peace process in Myanmar has been characterized by negotiations between the Myanmar army
(the Tatmadaw), the government, and various ethnic armed organizations (EAOs)
NORTH KOREA–SOUTH KOREA RELATIONS

• The relations began in 1945 with the division of Korea at the end of World War II
• Inter-Korean relations are the political, commercial, diplomatic, and military interactions
between Republic of Korea
• NK and SK have been locked in a conflict which erupted into open warfare in 1950 with the Korean
War and which has continued ever since
• According to a 2017 Korea Institute for National Unification, 58% of South Korean citizens had
responded that unification is necessary
THE DIFFERENCE IN IDEOLOGY

• South Korea wants to reunite with democratic, capitalistic ways, but North Korea wants to reunite
under Juche ideaology
• South Korea wants democratically elected president as the leader, while North wants Kim Jong Un and
his descendants to rule over the country
• South Korea wants Capitalism to fuel its economy. North wants North Korean version of Communism
DIVISION OF KOREA

• On August 9, 1945, in the closing days of World War Two, the Soviet Union declared war on Japan and
advanced into Korea
• The Allies had originally envisaged a joint trusteeship which would usher Korea towards independence
• In North Korea, the Soviet Union supported Korean Communists. Kim Il-sung, who from 1941 had
served in the Soviet Army, became the major political figure
• Politics in the South was more tumultuous, but the strongly anti-Communist Syngman Rhee emerged as
the most prominent politician
KOREAN WAR

• North Korea invaded the South on June 25, 1950, and swiftly overran most of the country
• In September 1950 the United Nations force, led by the United States, intervened to defend the South,
and advanced into North Korea
• Large numbers of people were displaced as a result of the war, and many families were divided by the
reconstituted border
• In 2007 it was estimated that around 750,000 people remained separated from immediate family
members, and family reunions have long been a diplomatic priority for the South
COLD WAR

• Competition between North and South Korea became key to decision-making on both sides
• Tensions escalated in the late 1960s with a series of low-level armed clashes known as the Korean DMZ
Conflict
• North Korea suspended talks in 1973 after the kidnapping of South Korean opposition leader Kim Dae-
jung by the Korean CIA
FOREIGN RELATIONS OF JAPAN

• Foreign relations of Japan are handled by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan
• Japanese foreign relations had to begin in 1945, when it was defeated in war and stripped of all of its
foreign conquests and possessions
• Japanese diplomatic policy has been based on close partnership with the United States
• Beyond its immediate neighbors, Japan has pursued a more active foreign policy in recent years,
recognizing the responsibility which accompanies its economic strength
LIST OF WARS INVOLVING JAPAN

• East Expedition of Emperor Jimmu • World War I


(c. 7th century BCE) (1914–1918)

• Civil war of Wa • Siberian Intervention


(2nd century CE) (1918–1922)

• Baekje-Tang War • World War II


(660–663) (1941–1945)

• Jinshin War • Iraq War


(675) (2003–2011)

• Former Nine Years War • Operation Ocean Shield


(1051–1063) (2009–2016)
JAPAN RELATIONS WITH OTHER COUNTRIES

• Japan has diplomatic relations with nearly all independent nations and has been an active member of
the UN since December 1956
• Its relations with countries other than those discussed earlier are mainly commercial and economic
• The continued growth of Japan's foreign aid appears to be motivated by two fundamental factors
• Although cultural and noneconomic ties with Western Europe grew significantly during the 1980s
CHINA-JAPAN RELATIONS

• China and Japan have gone to war three times since 1894
• The rise of China over the last thirty years has dispelled the notion that the two powers will never fight
again
• China’s military, fueled by decades of double-digit budget increases, is now the region’s largest
• The most likely way war could break out between the two powers is through an escalating crisis
• The United States and Japan have been close allies for more than fifty years
• The United States and Japan might also go to war with North Korea