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CREDENTIALING AND PRIVILEDGING

OF PHARMACISTS

The UK perspective

Professor Samantha Weston, Head of Pharmacy, UoRM


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Copyright University of Reading


TERMINOLOGY
• The terms credentialing and privileging do not exist in the UK

• The process of qualification, registration and specialisation is similar to


those routes seen globally
• 4 year undergraduate degree
• 1 year ‘pre-registration’ training
• Hospital, community, industry
• Registration assessment
• Registration as a newly registered ‘generalist’ pharmacist

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WHAT HAPPENS NEXT
• Post-graduate studies
• Certificate and Diploma in Clinical Pharmacy/Pharmacy Practice
• 2 years
• Part time study whilst full time working
• Application of the theory into practice
• Coursework and assessment

• Qualified as a junior ‘generalist’ pharmacist

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HOW TO CHOOSE?

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AFTER THAT
• Continue studies part time whilst working
• Choose area of expertise/interest
• e.g. Cardiac, renal, oncology, geriatric (care of the elderly),
paediatric, surgical , mental health, antimicrobials etc.
• Choose to formalise the knowledge
• Masters level study

• Additionally, CPD
• 9 pieces a year
• Called for assessment by regulators minimum every five years

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CPD
• Reflection on your area of practice
• Hospital/clinical
• Community enhanced services
• Advanced services
• Academia/education
• Research

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ADDITIONAL QUALIFICATIONS
• Pharmacist Independent Prescriber (accredited course)
• may prescribe autonomously for any condition within their clinical
competence
• Hospital Pharmacist Specialization
• European Association of Hospital Pharmacists
• Different regulations in each country
• Duration of study
• Qualification is ALWAYS dependent on ‘theory into practice’

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PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION
PROGRAMME OF ADVANCED
PRACTICE
• Recognition by Royal Pharmaceutical Society

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BUT…
• Recognition of specialist ability is NOT always (in fact, rarely!) seen via
qualification (privileging)

• Specialists are recognised by their demonstration of knowledge and


contribution to a multi-disciplinary team of healthcare professionals

• Few roles in UK Hospital Pharmacy (beyond Grade 7) require a formal


academic qualification

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BIBLIOGRAPHY
• House of Commons (HC). Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS
Foundation Trust Public Inquiry. London: The Stationery Office; 2013.
• Berwick D. A promise to learn – a commitment to act; Improving the
Safety of Patient in England. Department of Healt; 2013.
• Kennedy I. Learning from Bristol: the report of the public inquiry into
children’s heart surgery at the Bristol Royal Infirmary 1984 -1995. London:
The Stationery Office; 2001.
• www.pharmacyregulation.org
• www.ucl.ac.uk/pharmacy/documents/fip-advancedpractice-report-2015

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