You are on page 1of 411

|   





 



 
  

 

‡ RED SLIDE: These are notes that are very
important and should be recorded in your
science journal.
‡ BLACK SLIDE: Pay attention, follow
directions, complete projects as described
and answer required questions neatly.

Ä  
 
‡ Keep an eye out for ³The-Owl´ and raise
your hand as soon as you see him.
± He will be hiding somewhere in the slideshow

È  
È


Ä  
 



 

r   
 
 


  

 

Ä  
 



 

r
    
 
 



 
 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Making your bio-dome / Terrarium

Ä  
 
‡ Leave plenty of room for plants to grow!

ï
! 
 
" #! 

   $%&%

Ä  
 
‡ Don¶t over water your bio-dome!
‡ Don¶t knock it over!

Ä  
 
‡ Making your bio-dome / Terrarium
± 1st Thin layer of pebbles.
± 2nd Thin layer of sand on top of that.
± 3rd Thin layer of soil (brown)
± 4th Thicker layer of dark organic soil.
± 5th Add small pieces of various moss
± 6th Add a piece of lichen
± 7th Add some small plants
± 8th Add some small sticks with a mushroom on it.
± 9th Add a few organisms
‡ Just a few, no vertebrates allowed, do not over populate.
‡ Don¶t forget to lightly water it before closing the lid.

Ä  
 
r 
  
     
  

   '
 
 

Ä  
 
r h
 (')  
)

!  
'
  
 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

° 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 


  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

  |


|
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

  |


! |
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

  |


! |
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

+
  |


! |
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

+
  |


! |
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Place either a square or a circle
below. Square = Abiotic Circle = Biotic
° 

*

| 
+
  |


! |
 
  


 
Ä  
 
‡ What are some of the abiotic factors that
affect living organisms?

Ä  
 
r ï 
 ,
  -'

 ,

   !  !.
r
r
r
r
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r #
 !

Ä  
 
r ï !

Ä  
 
r 

Ä  
 
r °  

Ä  
 
r |
 

Ä  
 
r Î!  

Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|

(
Î
+
Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!

(
Î
+
Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(
Î
+
Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(/ 
Î
+
Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(/ 
Î 

+
Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(/ 
Î 



+
Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(/ 
Î 



+ 

Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(/ 
Î 



+ 

Ä  
 
r )|(Î +

|! '!


!
(/ 
Î 



+ 

Ä  
 
‡ SPONCH is also a delicious brand off cookie.

|

(
Î
+
Ä  
 
‡ The 8th abiotic factor is space.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Taking away space.
‡ Everyone onto the 4¶ by 6¶ carpet in the
middle of the room.
± Question to answer after a few minutes: How
do you rely on space?

Ä  
 
‡ Other non-living factors, gravity, pH,
substrate, oxygen levels, exposure, sound.
r  
  
'
 
'
 
 '


Ä  
 
‡ Do you have an ideal range for
temperature?

Ä  
 
‡ Which of the environments below is within
your range of tolerance for heat, light, and
temperature?

Ä  
 
‡ Which of the environments below is within
your range of tolerance for heat, light, and
temperature?

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! This environment is just right.
You can survive in the other environments
but it is more difficult.

Ä  
 
‡ Video! Biotic Ecosystem Components

Ä  
 
r 
 
° 

Ä  
 
‡ We will skip the physics associated with
light and the electro-magnetic spectrum for
a different unit of study.
± We will focus on light and ecology.

Ä  
 
r ( ''     .
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r   +
   , !-

Ä  
 
+(|ï+|
h"*+ï
(°("(Î
0("0|
Ä  
 
‡ Light can be a form of pollution.
è  !
''
   1
è 2  3 
 
1
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

Ä  
 
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

Ä  
 
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

èï3
!41
èÎ
 


 1

Ä  
 
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

Ä  
 
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

Ä  
 
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

Ä  
 
‡ It is important to give your fish some time
off. Turn off the lights at night. Your fish
will be happy in the morning.

Ä  
 
r +

       
r ° 
' )
   

Ä  
 
r †!   
'   

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Let¶s play with the lightning in this
room.
± Does switching the types of light effect your
mood?
‡ Activity! Let¶s play with the lightning in this
room.
± Does switching the types of light effect your
mood?
'
 !

!  
r ° 
 
3! ,

  -

Ä  
 
‡ Photosynthesis: Is a process that converts
carbon dioxide into organic compounds,
especially sugars, using the energy from
sunlight.

Ä  
 
r 

 
   ''  

! 
'   
r
r

r
r
r

Ä  
 
r  ï
' )
 
ï
' )
 




!3

Ä  
 
r ! !    
 !3

Ä  
 
r
!


Ä  
 
r |


Ä  
 
r °
 


Ä  
 
‡ Which letter generally gets the most
amount of light throughout the year?

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! Letter B because it is nearest to
the equator.

Ä  
 
‡ Location can be large scale
± Latitude on earth.

Ä  
 
‡ It can also be local.
± Limited light hits the floor in an established
forest.

Ä  
 
  
'' 
 
r ° 

 
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r 


ï 
  
 
'
  

   

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Visit your bio-dome.
± Please look for evidence of phototrophism.
± Which way is the light source.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Visit your bio-dome.
± Please look for evidence of phototrophism.
± Which way is the light source.

Ä  
 
r 

/ï
 
'
 
 

 '

! 
'
  

Ä  
 
‡ Video! Utilizing photokinesis:
± The Glow Worm.

Ä  
 
r 

35

3 5 #
 
 
  
'   
r 

6° 
r 76#


Ä  
 
r 

35

3 5 #
 
 
  
'   
r 

6° 
r 76#


Ä  
 
r 

35

3 5 #
 
 
  
'   
r 

6° 
r 76#


Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Observing Phototaxis in selected
Isopod species.
± Please draw the following in your journal.

° 

° 

Ä  
 
‡ Please create this spreadsheet for
collecting data. Go down to 30 minutes
±  

 

 
1

30

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was ï
 ° 
phototaxis observed 69% Did
in the Isopods?
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was ï
 ° 
phototaxis observed 69% Did
in the Isopods?
they prefer a particular environment?
$8%:%
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was ï
 ° 
phototaxis observed 69% Did
in the Isopods?
they prefer a particular9%:%
$8%:% environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was ï
 ° 
phototaxis observed 69% Did
in the Isopods?
they prefer a particular9%:%
$8%:% environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was ï
 ° 
phototaxis observed 69% Did
in the Isopods?
they prefer a particular9%:%
$8%:% environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
3 response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?
 6;88

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
ï
 36$8%
± Was ï
 ° 
phototaxis observed 69% Did
in the Isopods?
they prefer a particular9%:%
$8%:% environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
3 response. What does the° 
data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?
 6;88  6&::

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Create a column graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
0
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?
3

0
Is o p o d s in D a rk Is o p o d s in ig h t

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
Is o p o d s
Is o p o d s
in
in
D a rk
ig h t

± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Please complete the following in your
journal.
± Add the total number of Isopods in the light
and the dark and find the average.
‡ Total number of that group divided by time (30).
± Or create a pie graph comparing averages.
± Was phototaxis observed in the Isopods? Did
they prefer a particular environment?
‡ Base your answer on your data, include in
response. What does the data tell you?
± How could we improve this study?

Ä  
 
‡ Important note about the Electro-magnetic
spectrum.
± Some animals see different wavelengths of
light.

Ä  
 
‡ Question! Why are bees so efficient at
finding nectar in flowers and pollinating
flowers?

Ä  
 
‡ They see the world in the Ultra-violet of
UV spectrum.
± Note the bulls eye below.

Ä  
 
‡ Many insects, including bees see the
world and flower in UV (ultra-violet).
± Note the red bulls eye / target in UV.

Ä  
 
‡ Many insects, including bees see the
world and flower in UV (ultra-violet).
± Note the red bulls eye / target in UV.

Ä  
 
‡ Many insects, including bees see the
world and flower in UV (ultra-violet).
± Note the red bulls eye / target in UV.

ï  3 


 

   '  

Ä  
 
‡ Other animals such as snakes see the
world through the infrared spectrum.
± We feel infrared as heat.

Ä  
 
‡ Can you see the mouse below?
‡ Can you see the mouse below?
± Too bad you can¶t see using infrared?
‡ Can you see the mouse below?
± Too bad you can¶t see using infrared?
‡ Can you see the mouse below?
± Too bad you can¶t see using infrared?

è ! 
'1èï

!2 
 
 1
‡ What would the advantage of seeing the
world in infrared be for the snake?

Ä  
 
‡ Answer: The snake can see the heat of it¶s
prey, this is a helpful feature for hunting at
night and the prey¶s camouflage is does
not help.

Ä  
 
r h
!  ï
! 

'   
     ! !
  



Ä  
 
r h
!  ï
! 

'   
     ! !
  



Ä  
 
‡ Spray a cloud of light and disappear into
the dark.
± Organism uses a bacteria mutualism.

Ä  
 
Ä  
 
‡ Glow worms on the ceiling of a cave, they
can attract insects.
± What was name of the movement of
organisms toward or away from light.

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! What was name of the movement
of organisms toward or away from light.
± Phototaxis

Ä  
 
‡ Video! Optional (Bioluminescence)

Ä  
 
‡ Cuttlefish (Really a Mollusk)
± Has special cells called chromatophores that
reflect light so it can change colors to match
background.

Ä  
 
‡ Video! (Optional) Cuttlefish
± Short (hunting), Long (PBS)

Ä  
 
r Î
 
ï !

Ä  
 
r ï ! '' 
  .
r
r
r
r
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r ! '





Ä  
 
r ! '




(Î

Ä  
 
r ! '




°(|

Ä  
 
r ! 
  

Ä  
 
r ! 
 

  


Ä  
 
r ! 
 

  


* 

Ä  
 
r ! 
 

  


* ï
 !
 


Ä  
 
r ! 
 

  


* ï
 !
 


Ä  
 
‡ Some seeds require a freeze before they
germinate.
± Prevents growing in the fall?

Ä  
 
‡ Why would an apple seed not want to
germinate in the fall?

Ä  
 
‡ Why would an apple seed not want to
germinate in the fall?
‡ Answer: The winter could kill the young
plant. Growing in the Spring, and having
the summer and fall ensures a long first
growing season.

Ä  
 
‡ Why would an apple seed not want to
germinate in the fall?
‡ Answer: The winter could kill the young
plant. Growing in the Spring, and having
the summer and fall ensures a long first
growing season.

Ä  
 
r !
 

  

Ä  
 
‡ Why do deciduous trees drop their leaves
in the fall?

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! The water inside the leaves will
freeze, not allowing photosynthesis to
occur, and killing the leaf.
± ³If you don¶t use it, lose it.´

Ä  
 
‡ Conifer trees do drop needles, they are
growing and dropping throughout the year.

Ä  
 
‡ Conifer trees photosynthesize all year
because they have a sap antifreeze.
Broadleaf deciduous trees can create
more sugar but not during the winter.

Ä  
 
r ''
   



 

Ä  
 
r ''
   



 

Ä  
 
r  !   ! 
 '
 
  

Ä  
 
r   
     !

Ä  
 
‡ Seasonal changes in temperature causes
many animals to migrate.

Ä  
 
‡ Area of focus within temperature:
Thermoregulation.
‡ What did you wear to school today? Why?

Ä  
 
r ï
 !  
   
'

 
3 
   !
   
!

Ä  
 
‡ Thermoregulation is the ability of an
organism to keep its body temperature
within certain boundaries.
± Remember the range of tolerance.

Ä  
 
è'     
1èï 2)
2
 
'
 

!1

Ä  
 
‡ Our bodies have a range of tolerance.
± Know your range and don¶t over do it.

Ä  
 
r ï
 
' 
 !  

r
r

Ä  
 
r  

   !  

r h
  !  


Ä  
 
r   

 

 
 ! 
 
  
r     ! 

Ä  
 
r   

 

 
 ! 
 
  
r     ! 

Ä  
 


 

'
r h
 

 
 
 

Ä  
 
r h
  
 !  
/ 
r
r
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r #




  

Ä  
 
‡ Many animals make dens that help keep
the animal warm / cool and dry.

Ä  
 
‡ Live close to the ground, Many Blueberries
live close to ground to absorb heat.

Ä  
 
‡ Lizards change their locations frequently
throughout the day to regulate their body
temperature.

Ä  
 
‡ Go inside for the winter.
r  
 !
  

Ä  
 
‡ By raising off of the ground, more air
travels under the lizard, cooling it down.

Ä  
 
‡ By facing the sun, the lizard will minimize
the amount of light that will hit it¶s skin, and
thus cooling it down.

Ä  
 
‡ Even plants will use position to the sun to
stay cool.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Feeling how superposition can
affect heat loss. (Next slide is white to
show heat waves)
± Danger! Plate is dangerously hot!!!!
± About a foot above hot plate
‡ Feel air above hot plate with hand horizontal
‡ Feel air above hot plate with hand vertical
‡ Was there a difference?

Ä  
 
‡ Use your tail to shade you.

Ä  
 
r    

Ä  
 
‡ When it¶s cold, take a warm bath in a hot
spring like these Japanese Macaques.

Ä  
 
‡ When it¶s cold, take a warm bath in a hot
spring like these Japanese Macaques.
è  ' 

)<!  

  ' 1

Ä  
 
è0
!
! 
! 


 1

Ä  
 
‡ Doing the cold dance.

Ä  
 
‡ Rubbing hands creates friction / heat.
± Everybody try.

Ä  
 
r  

  ï'! 

' 
 

Ä  
 
‡ Are the pictures below a behavioral or
physiological adaptation to cold
temperature.

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! Behavioral. The animals can
control to roll up to conserve heat.

Ä  
 
r  

    

  !

 
)
!
r ï
!   


 
 !
   
r
r
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r  

    

  !

 
)
!
r ï
!   


 
 !
   
r
r
r
r
r

Ä  
 
r  =
 


Ä  
 
‡ Sweat Glands: As you sweat the water on
your skin is evaporated and the phase
change pulls heat from your body.

Ä  
 
‡ From breathing or panting.

è

 
41

Ä  
 
r    !  

'


r #  '

Ä  
 
r    !  

'


r #  '

Ä  
 
‡ To stay warm, some marine mammals
have their circulatory system set up so
warm blood moves to their core before
going to the skin.

Ä  
 
r *
 

 !  


Ä  
 
‡ Grow more fur or feathers.

Ä  
 
‡ The more air you trap in your fur or
feathers the better insulated you will be.

Ä  
 
‡ Even insects will grow more setae (fur like
hair)

Ä  
 
‡ Put on weight / layers of insulating fat
(blubber).

Ä  
 
r +  
,-

Ä  
 
‡ You want big windows to cool down.

Ä  
 
‡ The coolest place on this elephant is it¶s
ears.

Ä  
 
‡ The coolest place on this elephant is it¶s
ears.

Ä  
 
‡ The African Elephant has large ears
because it¶s environment is very hot.

Ä  
 
‡ The Asian Elephant lives in an
environment that is not as hot.

Ä  
 
‡ Which one lives in the warmer climate?
‡ Answer! The African Elephant

Ä  
 
‡ These windows are usually thin
membranes with a lot of blood flow
through them.

Ä  
 
‡ Frilled Neck Lizard: Used to scare away
predators and some thermoregulation.

Ä  
 
‡ Thermal windows have been around for
millions of years.

Ä  
 
‡ Maasai in Kenya are tall and thin, adapted
for maximum heat loss in the heat of East
Africa.

Ä  
 
‡ If you live in a cold environment, then you
will usually have small ears to retain your
heat.

Ä  
 
‡ If you live in a cold environment, then you
will usually have small ears to retain your
heat.

Ä  
 
‡ If you live in a cold environment, then you
will usually have small ears to retain your
heat.

" 

Ä  
 
‡ If you live in a cold environment, then you
will usually have small ears to retain your
heat.

" ï



)3



Ä  
 
‡ Which rabbit lives in the warm climate, and
which in the cold climate?

Ä  
 
Ä  
 
Snowshoe hare Jack Rabbit
Cold Climate Warm Climate

Ä  
 
Ä  
 
‡ Which fox lives in the warm climate, and
which lives in the cold climate.

Ä  
 
Arctic Fox Desert Fox
(Cold Climate) (Warm Climate)

Ä  
 
‡ The Inuit of the Arctic are short and squat,
perfectly adapted for retaining heat in the
cold winter.

Ä  
 
‡ Who is more adapted to live in a hot dry
climate?

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! Who is more adapted to live in a
hot dry climate?

è2
   3
  

! 41

Ä  
 
‡ Who is more adapted to live in a cold wet
climate?

Ä  
 
è* 
! 
41è2
'= 41
r | #! 
   /
 
)    

Ä  
 
‡ Teeth chattering: A form of localized
shivering. It means your cold.

Ä  
 
r *

!|3!    )


'
 !)  !
!

)  
3 
!


Ä  
 
‡ Activity Simulation! Going Outside to
Experience Physiological and Behavioral
Thermoregulation.
± Note: I¶m not trying to just freeze you, I am
hoping you learn about the messages your
body is telling you in response to the cold.
Hopefully you will recognize these and make
necessary adjustments in thermoregulation.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity Simulation! Going Outside to
Experience Physiological and Behavioral
Thermoregulation.
± Note: I¶m not trying to just freeze you, I am
hoping you learn about the messages your
body is telling you in response to the cold.
Hopefully you will recognize these and make
necessary adjustments in thermoregulation.

Ä  
 
‡ Please record the time the following occur.
‡ Record all behavioral adaptations.
ï      ï 
Shivering P
Teeth Chattering P
Goosebumps P
Cold Dance B
Rubbing of Arms B
Hugging Yourself B
Ä  
 
‡ Outside simulation: Some will become
cold quickly, others will not. If you need to
go inside, you will be allowed.
± What physical, and behavioral adaptations to
cold temperatures occurred in your body?
± What did you learn about yourself and
thermoregulation?

Ä  
 
‡ Outside simulation: Some will become
cold quickly, others will not. If you need to
go inside, you will be allowed.
± What physical, and behavioral adaptations to
cold temperatures occurred in your body?
± What did you learn about yourself and
thermoregulation?

Ä  
 
‡ Outside simulation: Some will become
cold quickly, others will not. If you need to
go inside, you will be allowed.
± What physical, and behavioral adaptations to
cold temperatures occurred in your body?
± What did you learn about yourself and
thermoregulation?

Ä  
 
‡ Outside simulation: Some will become
cold quickly, others will not. If you need to
go inside, you will be allowed.
± What physical, and behavioral adaptations to
cold temperatures occurred in your body?
± What did you learn about yourself and
thermoregulation?

Ä  
 
r + 
  

 
 !
    
 
! ! '! 


Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature 98.6 -
96 degrees F
± Shivering - not under voluntary control
± Can't do complex motor functions (ice climbing
or skiing) can still walk & talk

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature 98.6 -
96 degrees F
± Shivering - not under voluntary control.
± Can't do complex motor functions (ice climbing
or skiing) can still walk & talk

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature 98.6 -
96 degrees F
± Shivering - not under voluntary control.
± Can't do complex motor functions (ice climbing
or skiing) can still walk & talk.
‡ ± 
    - core temperature
95 - 93 degrees F
± Dazed consciousness
± Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in
hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted
peripheral blood flow
± Slurred speech
± Violent shivering
± Irrational behavior - Paradoxical Undressing -
person starts to take off clothing, unaware
she/he is cold

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature
95 - 93 degrees F
± Dazed consciousness.
± Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in
hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted
peripheral blood flow
± Slurred speech
± Violent shivering
± Irrational behavior - Paradoxical Undressing -
person starts to take off clothing, unaware
she/he is cold

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature
95 - 93 degrees F
± Dazed consciousness.
± Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in
hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted
peripheral blood flow.
± Slurred speech
± Violent shivering
± Irrational behavior - Paradoxical Undressing -
person starts to take off clothing, unaware
she/he is cold

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature
95 - 93 degrees F
± Dazed consciousness.
± Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in
hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted
peripheral blood flow.
± Slurred speech.
± Violent shivering
± Irrational behavior - Paradoxical Undressing -
person starts to take off clothing, unaware
she/he is cold

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature
95 - 93 degrees F
± Dazed consciousness
± Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in
hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted
peripheral blood flow
± Slurred speech.
± Violent shivering.
± Irrational behavior - Paradoxical Undressing -
person starts to take off clothing, unaware
she/he is cold

Ä  
 
‡ ± 
    - core temperature
95 - 93 degrees F
± Dazed consciousness.
± Loss of fine motor coordination - particularly in
hands - can't zip up parka, due to restricted
peripheral blood flow.
± Slurred speech.
± Violent shivering.
± Irrational behavior - Person starts to take off
clothing, unaware she/he is cold.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases ±
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ | 
   
- core temperature 92 - 86
degrees and below º   
 
± Shivering occurs in waves, violent then pause, pauses
get longer until shivering finally ceases
± Person falls to the ground, can't walk, curls up into a
fetal position to conserve heat
± Muscle rigidity develops - because peripheral blood flow
is reduced and due to lactic acid and CO2 buildup in the
muscles
± Skin is pale
± Pupils dilate
± Pulse rate decreases
± At 90 degrees the body tries to move into hibernation,
shutting down all peripheral blood flow and reducing
breathing rate and heart rate.
± at 86 degrees the body is in a state of "metabolic
icebox." The person looks dead but is still alive.

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Ä  
 

   
± Cold temperatures + wind chills
± Improper clothing and equipment
± Wetness
± Fatigue, exhaustion
± Dehydration
± Poor food intake
± No knowledge of hypothermia
± Alcohol intake - causes blood flow problems
leading to increased heat loss

Ä  
 
‡ Put the yellow line where a human may
become moderately hypothermic.

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! 94 Degrees Fahrenheit or 34.44
Degrees Celsius

Ä  
 
‡ Place the yellow line where a humans core
temperature should be at normal range.

Ä  
 
‡ Answer: 98.6 degrees F,
‡ 37 degrees Celsius

Ä  
 
r +  + 
   !
 

 ) ! ' !)



 

  

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± What are some symptoms?

| 

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± Profuse sweating and high temperature.
Working in sun and warm temperatures

| 

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± What are some symptoms?

Î/

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± Headache, sweating stops, hot dry skin,
feeling faint.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± How can you get it?

Î/

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± Labor / hard work during high temperatures.
Also wearing excessive layers when it is
warm.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat exhaustion warning signs.
± Abnormally high temperature.
± So hot you might collapse.
± Appear pale.
± Sweating profusely.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat exhaustion warning signs.
± Abnormally high temperature.
± So hot you might collapse.
± Appear pale.
± Sweating profusely.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat exhaustion warning signs.
± Abnormally high temperature.
± So hot you might collapse.
± Appear pale.
± Sweating profusely.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat exhaustion warning signs.
± Abnormally high temperature.
± So hot you might collapse.
± Appear pale.
± Sweating profusely.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat exhaustion warning signs.
± Abnormally high temperature.
± So hot you might collapse.
± Appear pale.
± Sweating profusely.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat exhaustion warning signs.
± Abnormally high temperature.
± So hot you might collapse.
± Appear pale.
± Sweating profusely.

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± What should you do to prevent heat
exhaustion?

Î/

Ä  
 
‡ Heat Exhaustion.
± Drink lots of water, seek shade and cooler
temperatures, don¶t work when it is too hot!

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Tips to avoid heat exhaustion and heat
stroke, aka hyperthermia.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink lots of water / rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
è )1
èÎ
 41
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Limit your water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Limit your water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
è )1
èÎ
 41
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Avoid shade, and wear tight fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Avoid shade, and wear tight fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
è )1
èÎ
 41
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Avoid rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Avoid rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Which tip is bogus from the list below to
avoid heat exhaustion and heat stroke.
± Be smart about when you are going to be
active, high noon on the hottest day ±.
± Know the weather and heat index.
± Drink plenty of water and rehydrating fluids.
± Seek shade, and wear loose fitting clothing.
± Take rest breaks (rehydrate)
± Place cool damp towels on forehead.
± Don¶t drink alcohol.

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Seek medical attention if needed. To cool
down if you have heat exhaustion«

Ä  
 
‡ Never leave a baby or pet in a car with the
windows up! Not even for a minute!
± Even with the windows down, it is not a safe
practice.
± Hundreds die every year.
‡ Never leave a baby or pet in a car with the
windows up! Not even for a minute!
± Even with the windows down, it is not a safe
practice.
± Hundreds die every year.
‡ Never leave a baby or pet in a car with the
windows up! Not even for a minute!
± Even with the windows down, it is not a safe
practice.
± Hundreds die every year.
‡ Put the yellow line where a human may
become moderately hyperthermic.
‡ Answer! Hyperthermia occurs when your
body temp is 37.5±38.3 °C (100±101 °F)
‡ Answer! Life threatening occus when your
body temp is 40 °C (104 °F)
‡ Again, organisms have a range of tolerance,
for humans, your body temperature should
be close to 98.6 degrees F, or 37 degrees
Celsius.

Ä  
 
r 
''
!
  !ï




'
 

Ä  
 
‡ Note ± There is still some debate among
scientist to the terms warm and cold
blooded.

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
‡ Which from the pictures below has general
warm-bloodedness, and which has cold?

Ä  
 
h


h



(
°



,

r   -


#  
   !
 
'
  
 


Ä  
 
‡ Which has warm bloodedness, and which
is generally cold blooded?

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! A shark is a fish, and is generally
cold-blooded while a dolphin is a mammal
and is generally warm-blooded.

Ä  
 
‡ Answer! A shark is a fish, and is generally
cold-blooded while a dolphin is a mammal
and is generally warm-blooded.


h



Ä  
 
‡ Answer! A shark is a fish, and is generally
cold-blooded while a dolphin is a mammal
and is generally warm-blooded.


h

 h



Ä  
 
r  
 

  
 

 

Ä  
 
r     





 
 '

!)  
 
‡ Warm-blooded organisms need to eat
often to maintain a higher body
temperature. Eat up or die!

Ä  
 
r
h


  2 


 !       !
r  2
   2 
) 2
  2
 

Ä  
 
r
h


  2 


 !       !
r  2
   2 
) 2
  2
 

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Cold-blooded Olympics: 10 Meter
Dash during the winter.
± The opposite of a race, last person to finish
wins. (Chariots of Fire-MP3 in handouts)
± One person from each table group.
± You must be moving forward and can¶t stop.
± The most animated and slowest racer wins.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Cold-blooded Olympics: 10 Meter
Dash during the winter.
± The opposite of a race, last person to finish
wins. (Chariots of Fire-MP3?)
± One person from each table group.
± You must be moving forward and can¶t stop.
± The most animated and slowest racer wins.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Cold-blooded Olympics: 10 Meter
Dash during the winter.
± The opposite of a race, last person to finish
wins. (Chariots of Fire-MP3?)
± One person from each table group.
± You must be moving forward and can¶t stop.
± The most animated and slowest racer wins.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Cold-blooded Olympics: 10 Meter
Dash during the winter.
± The opposite of a race, last person to finish
wins. (Chariots of Fire-MP3?)
± One person from each table group.
± You must be moving forward and can¶t stop.
± The most animated and slowest racer wins.

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! Cold-blooded Olympics: 10 Meter
Dash during the winter.
± The opposite of a race, last person to finish
wins. (Chariots of Fire-MP3?)
± One person from each table group.
± You must be moving forward and can¶t stop.
± The most animated and slowest racer wins.

Ä  
 
‡ Turtles and other reptiles need to seek
warm temperatures when it¶s cold to raise
their metabolism so they can become
active.

Ä  
 
‡ So where do all of the reptiles, fish, and
amphibians go in the winter, and what do
they do?

Ä  
 
‡ Most reptiles and amphibians find a nice
place to wait out the colder temperatures.

Ä  
 
‡ Some snakes such as garter snakes den
together during the winter.

Ä  
 
r +


  
'  
 
 
 ,|

  )

  -

Ä  
 
‡ They still breathe and are alive, but the
heart may only pump a few times an hour,
they can¶t just jump up out of it. They
need to warm up first.

Ä  
 
r  




 >!
!   
! 



 


Ä  
 
‡ After this python consumes this deer, it
won¶t have to eat for many months.

Ä  
 
‡ Video! Snake eating an egg. Snakes can
detach their lower jaw, and the upper jaw
is not fused to their braincase, both
working together can allow a snake to eat
large prey items.

Ä  
 
‡ Another advantage is that cold blooded
organisms aren¶t affected by as many
pathogens because their blood gets warm
and cold.

Ä  
 
‡ Another advantage is that cold blooded
organisms aren¶t affected by as many
pathogens because their blood gets warm
and cold.
è|3 1
èh! 2



!  ' !41

Ä  
 
r  ï  2  

  !   

Ä  
 
‡ Activity! The effects of temperature on
Isopods.
± Please record the following visual into your
journal.

Ä  
 
‡ Please record the number of Isopods that
move into a new room over a 30 minute
period.
± One environment is room temp.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± The other environment is chilled on top of ice.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± Use the IIII method every time an Isopod
enters a new room. Do both warm and cold
together as a table group.

Ä  
 
‡ Please record the number of Isopods that
move into a new room over a 30 minute
period.
± One environment is room temp.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± The other environment is chilled on top of ice.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± Use the IIII method every time an Isopod
enters a new room. Do both warm and cold
together as a table group.

Ä  
 
‡ Please record the number of Isopods that
move into a new room over a 30 minute
period.
± One environment is room temp.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± The other environment is chilled on top of ice.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± Use the IIII method every time an Isopod
enters a new room. Do both warm and cold
together as a table group.

Ä  
 
‡ Please record the number of Isopods that
move into a new room over a 30 minute
period.
± One environment is room temp.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± The other environment is chilled on top of ice.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± Use the IIII method every time an Isopod
enters a new room. Do both warm and cold
together as a table group.

Ä  
 
‡ Please record the number of Isopods that
move into a new room over a 30 minute
period.
± One environment is room temp.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± The other environment is chilled on top of ice.
‡ Record temperature in Celsius of chamber.
± Use the IIII method every time an Isopod
enters a new room. Do both warm and cold
together as a table group.

Ä  
 
‡ Questions to Temperature and Isopods.
± Please total the room temperature, and cold
data.
÷  
     
±

Cold Environment

Warm Environment / Room Temp

± Create a column graph showing the data


compared to temperature.
± Did temperature of the environment affect the
movement capabilities of the Isopods?
Explain?
± How could we improve or make this study
more accurate?
Ä