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Ú INTRODUCTION

Bluetooth is a wireless technology that allows computers, phones and other devices
to talk to each other over short distances (up to 100 meters). Bluetooth uses radio waves (in
the 2.4 Gigahertz range), and is designed to be a secure and inexpensive way of connecting
and exchanging information between devices without wires.

You'll find Bluetooth in many of the newer mobile phones, handheld computers, laptops,
printers, handheld organizers, as well as in all sorts of products.
BASIC USES OF BLUETOOTH

Ú sending photos from your mobile


Ú exchanging business cards
Ú sending voice from a headset to a mobile phone
Ú and real-time satellite navigation using GPS [The Global Positioning
System (GPS) is a space-based global navigation satellite
system that provides reliable location and time information in all
weather and at all times and anywhere on or near the Earth.]
USING BLUETOOTH

Here's an example of some of the things you can do with


Bluetooth:

Transfer files (such as mp3s and photos) to and from your mobile
A wire-free headset for your mobile
Backup your PDA or mobile to your PC
Use a Bluetooth GPS device for satellite navigation on your mobile phone, PDA or
laptop.
BLUETOOTH PRODUCTS

MOBILE HANDSET HANDHELD PDA PHONE HEADSET USB DONGLES


AND ADAPTERS

GPS NAVIGATION MODEM/ACCESS POINT PRINTER/PRINT ADAPTER


ÑIRELESS LAN

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A wireless local area network (ÑLAN) links two or more devices


using some wireless distribution method, and usually providing a
connection through an access point to the wider internet. This gives
users the mobility to move around within a local coverage area and
still be connected to the network.
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The private home or small business ÑLAN
Commonly, a home or business ÑLAN employs one or two access points to broadcast
signal around a 100- to 200-foot radius.

The enterprise class ÑLAN


This type employs a large number of individual access points to broadcast the signal to a
wide area.
Ñireless ÑAN (wide area network)
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ADVANTAGES OF ÑIRELESS LAN

Ú Easy set-up
Ú Easy access
Ú More users of the same
network
Reasons to choose wireless networking over
traditional wired networks include:
- Easy set up
-Flexibility of location and data ports is required
-Roaming capability
Network access is desired outdoors; e.g., outside a home or office
building
Ñi-Fi
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ADVANTAGES OF USING Ñi-Fi
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DISADVANTAGES OF USING Ñi-Fi
Ú Password and Security

Ú Signal Strength Sensitivity

Ú Effect of Climatic Conditions


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Night Vision

Infrared is used in night vision equipment when there is insufficient


visible light to see. Night vision devices operate through a process
involving the conversion of ambient light photons into electrons
which are then amplified by a chemical and electrical process and
then converted back into visible light. Infrared light sources can be
used to augment the available ambient light for conversion by
night vision devices, increasing in-the-dark visibility without
actually using a visible light source.
The use of infrared light and night vision devices should not be
confused with thermal imaging which creates images based on
differences in surface temperature by detecting infrared radiation
(heat) that emanates from objects and their surrounding
environment. 

  


   


  
   



 
 
 
   

  


 

 
 


  


 
The Earth as an infrared emitter

The Earth's surface and the clouds absorb visible and invisible
radiation from the sun and re-emit much of the energy as infrared
back to the atmosphere. Certain substances in the atmosphere,
chiefly cloud droplets and water vapor, but also carbon dioxide,
methane, nitrous oxide, sulfur hexafluoride, and
chlorofluorocarbons,absorb this infrared, and re-radiate it in all
directions including back to Earth. Thus the greenhouse effect
keeps the atmosphere and surface much warmer than if the
infrared absorbers were absent from the atmosphere.
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