You are on page 1of 24

1.1.

1: Exit Slip Name:__________________


1-2. SLEEPY TIME

How much sleep do you get at night? On a sticky dot, write the time you usually go to bed and the time you usually get up. For example, the dot below shows that a student goes to bed at 10:00 p.m. and wakes up at 6:00 a.m. On the scatter plot poster on the wall, find the time that you go to bed on the horizontal axis (the line that lies flat). Then trace straight up from that point high enough to be even with the time that you get up on the vertical axis (the line that stands straight up) and place your sticky dot on the graph.
When all the data is collected, work with your team to answer the questions below. Be sure to use the team role descriptions following this problem in your text. a. What is the most common bedtime for your class members? How can you tell?

In your own words, define the terms below. What do they mean to you? Histogram (birthday chart)

Scatter Plot (bed time)


b. Which dots represent the students who get the most sleep?

The least sleep?

How much sleep does each of these students get?

c. If you were to go to bed an hour earlier, how would your sticky dot move?

Venn Diagram (pets)

What if you were to get up an hour earlier?

d. In general, how much sleep do students in your class get? 1-3. CATS AND DOGS Do you have pets? If so, what kind? For this activity, place your initials on two sticky dots. Then place one sticky dot on the class bar graph and one on the Venn diagram (shown below right). Then answer the questions below. a. Were you able to place your dot easily on both graphs? Was there anyone who had a hard time placing their dot on either of the graphs? Explain.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

b. Is there any information that is easier to see from looking at the bar graph?

Describe two things you learned today:

The Venn diagram?

c. What kinds of information are best represented in bar graphs?

Venn diagrams?

1-4. SURVEYING THE CLASS Now you will work with your team to make up some questions to ask the class and design the graphs that will best represent the answers. Your task: Write down three questions that you could ask students in the class that will help you learn more about them. Think about a way to display the answers for each question. Then contribute your ideas to your team and, as a team, decide on your three favorite questions to ask. For each question, decide whether the answers should be shown on a histogram, a scatter plot, a bar graph, a Venn diagram, or whether there is another, better way to show the data. Try to ask questions that will give you the information you want. For example, asking Do you play sports? will get lots of yes and no answers, with no information about what types of sports people play. However, the question, What sport(s) do you play? will enable you to learn if you have soccer players, swimmers, or other athletes in your class. Some sample questions are provided below to help you get your conversations started .How many hours was the longest car or bus trip you have been on? How many cousins do you have? How did you get to school this morning? Brainstorm your 3 questions here- be sure that your questions are different from the other students around you! 1.

For the following questions, rank them on a scale of 1-5, 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. Circle one.

How productive was your group today?


1 2 3 4 5

How well did your group work together as a team?

How well did you participate and contribute to your team? 1 2 3 4 5

2.

3.

1.1.2: Exit Slip Name:__________________


1-7. COLOR-RAMA Your teacher will challenge your class to a game of Color-Rama! To play, a marker will be placed on the orange space on the board below. Your class will need to select one color for your class and a different color for your teacher. Then a volunteer will flip a coin three times. If the coin lands with the + showing, the marker will move one space to the right, and if the is showing, then the marker will move one space to the left. If after three flips, the marker is on your classs color, your class wins! If it lands on a color no one picked, then no one wins. Which color should you choose? Is there a way to predict which color the marker will land on? Before you play, discuss the questions below with your team and record your answers. When talking about strategies, be sure to describe your ideas and explain your reasoning. When your class has considered all the colors, move on to problem 1-8. Does it matter which color is chosen?

What is something you GOT today that you feel really comfortable with or good about?

What is something you feel like you still NEED to know in order to understand this better?

Are all the colors equally likely to win? How can you decide?

1-8. LEARNING MORE ABOUT THE GAME If you want to win, is one color a better choice than the others? Is there a color that you should not pick? One way to answer these questions is to play the game and keep track of what happens. Your teacher will give you and a partner a Lesson 1.1.2A Resource Page and a coin with sides labeled + and . You and your partner will need a small object such as an eraser or paper clip to serve as a marker. Once you have all of your supplies, follow the directions below. a. Play the game several times and be sure to select a different color each time. Keep track of which colors win and lose each time in your interactive notebook. What do you notice?

PARKING LOT (any questions???):

b.After you and your partner have played the game at least five times, join with another pair of students to form a team and discuss the following questions: Does the color you choose seem to affect your chances of winning? Is each color choice equally likely to result in a win? Explain why or why not in as many ways as you can.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

c.Play the game a few more times. Do your results seem to confirm your answers from part (b) above?

Describe two things you learned today:

Why do your results make sense?

1-9. PLAYING THE GAME Now is the moment you have been waiting for! As a class, choose two colors (one for your class, one for your teacher) that you think will improve the classs chance of beating the teacher.

a.Is there any color you could choose that would guarantee that you would win this game every time that you played? Explain why or why not.

b.Is there a color that would guarantee that you would not win? Explain why or why not.

For the following questions, rank them on a scale of 1-5, 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. Circle one.

1-10. What makes a game fair? Discuss this question with your partner and then think about whether there is a way to change the rules of Color-Rama to make it a fair game. What are changes to the rules that you would recommend?

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

a.Play the game a few times with your new rules. Be prepared to describe to the class the changes you made and explain your reasons for making the changes.

How well did your group work together as a team?

b.Is your new game fair?________

If not, could you make it fair?

How well did you participate and contribute to your team? 1 2 3 4 5

Work with your team to find a way to explain how you know your game is fair or why you cannot make it fair.

1.1.3: Exit Slip Name:__________________


1-18. DOT PATTERN Copy the dot pattern in the space below.

For example 1-18. generalize this pattern by finding a way to describe any figure in the pattern. In other words, if you knew a figure number, how could you decide what the figure looks like, even if you cannot draw it?
Figure 3

Figure1

Figure 2

a. What should the 4th and 5th figures look like? Draw them on your paper.

Figure 4

Figure 5

b.How can you describe the way the pattern is growing? Can you find more than one way?

c.How many dots would be in the 10th figure of the pattern?__________ What would it look like? Draw it below.

d.How many dots would be in the 30th figure?____________ How can you describe the figure without drawing it? Can you describe it with numbers, and a diagram? Write your explanation below: words,

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

1-21. Additional Challenge: Study the dot pattern at right. a.Sketch the 4th and 5th figures.

Describe two things you learned today:

b.Predict how many dots will be in the 10th figure.__________ Show how you know.

For the following questions, rank them on a scale of 1-5, 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. Circle one.

c.Predict how many dots will be in the 100th figure:___________

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

Show how you know.

How well did your group work together as a team?


1
d.In what ways is this pattern different from others in this lesson?

How well did you participate and contribute to your team? 1 2 3 4 5

1.1.4: Exit Slip Name:__________________


1-27. TRAIL MIX Rowena and Polly were making trail mix. Rowena had 4 cups of raisins, and Polly had 4 cups of peanuts. Polly poured exactly one cup of her peanuts into Rowenas raisins and stirred them up, as shown in the diagram at right. Then Rowena poured exactly one cup of her new peanut-and- raisin mix back into Pollys peanuts. Did Rowena get more of Pollys peanuts, or did Polly get more of Rowenas raisins? Your guess:______________________ Your teams guess:____________________ Your task: First decide by yourself what you think the answer to this question is. Then share your ideas with your team and write them here.

LEARNING LOG
your first entry, you will consider the process by which you worked with your team and your class to make sense of Trail Mix (problem 1-27). Please write the questions below in your interactive notebook and respond to them in full sentences. Title this entry Making Sense of a Challenging Problem and label it with todays date. What did people say or what questions did they ask that helped you to make sense of this problem?

Together make a guess (also called a conjecture) about which girl got more of the others snack item. Write your answer here:

What did you say or what questions did you ask that helped you to make sense of this problem? What would you advise another student to do in order to make sense of this problem?

Explain your conjecture with words, numbers and symbols, diagrams, models, or anything else you think will convince another student.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

1-28. Rowena and Polly still cannot agree about who has more of the others item. Rowena is still sure that Polly got more of her raisins, and Polly is sure that Rowena got more of her peanuts. In order to make sense of what happened, they decided to try a simpler experiment. Rowena got a cup of 10 red beans, and Polly got a cup of 10 white beans. Polly gave 3 white beans to Rowena, and Rowena stirred them into her red ones. Then she closed her eyes and chose 3 beans from her mixture at random to give back to Polly. The girls then examined each cup. a.Try their experiment a few times with a partner. What happens each time? Trial 1 what happened?

Describe two things you learned today:

Trial 2 what happened?

Trial 3 what happened?

For the following questions, rank them on a scale of 1-5, 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. Circle one.

Work with your team to find a way to explain why your results make sense

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

b.Would you have gotten similar results if you had exchanged 5 beans? 6 beans? 20 beans? Be ready to explain your thinking.

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

c.With your team, consider whether your ideas about Rowenas raisins and Pollys peanuts have changed. If so, write and explain your new conjecture. If not, explain why you still agree with your original conjecture. Be sure to include anything you think will be convincing as you write down your ideas and be prepared to share your ideas with the class.

How well did you participate and contribute to your team? 1 2 3 4 5

1.1.5: Exit Slip Name:__________________

1-36. TINY TOWERS To begin to investigate this question, start by collecting data. a.How many pennies does it take to build a tower that is one centimeter tall? Use the tools provided by your teacher to find out.

LEARNING LOG The relationship between the number of pennies in a stack and the height of that stack is an example of a proportional relationship. Talk with your team about how you can describe this relationship.Then record your ideas in your notebook, using numbers, words, and tables to help show your thinking. Title this entry Beginning to Think About Proportional Relationships and label it with todays date.

# pennies in 1 cm?______________ a.In the space below, work with your team to complete the missing information. Be prepared to explain your reasoning to the class.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

1-37. THE HUNDRED-PENNY TOWER I have an idea! Carol said. If I know how tall a tower of 100 pennies would be, maybe that can help me figure out how tall a tower of 1,000,000 pennies would be. a.Discuss this idea with your team. How could Carols idea work?

CHALLENGE: How many 10s are in 100? ____________ How many 10s are in 1,000? __________

b.Work with your team to figure out how tall a tower of 100 pennies would be.

How many 100s are in 10,000? _________ How do you know?

Record your answer here:________________ Can you find more than one way to figure this out? Be sure that each member of your team is prepared to explain your thinking to the class.

1-38. THE MILLION-PENNY TOWER


Now it is time to answer the big question: How tall would a tower of a million pennies be? Your task: Work with your team to calculate the height of a tower of 1,000,000 pennies as accurately as you can. Can you find the height more than one way? Be prepared to explain your ideas to the class. Feel free to use your notebook if you need more space.

For the following questions, rank them on a scale of 1-5, 1 being the worst and 5 being the best. Circle one.

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

1.2.1: Exit Slip Name:__________________ In the space below, write a few sentences summary of what you did and learned today:

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

1-53. How could you make your arrangement even clearer?

Describe two things you learned today:

a.Work with your team to rearrange the pennies to improve how well others can understand it. b. In the space that follows, draw a diagram that represents your new arrangement (without drawing all of the pennies themselves).

How productive was your group today?


c.Compare your diagram with those made by your teammates. Are some diagrams clearer matches to the arrangement than others?

As a team, decide on the best way to represent your arrangement in a diagram. Consider using ideas from multiple drawings. When all team members have agreed on the best diagram, copy it onto your paper here:

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did you participate and contribute to your team?


1 2 3 4 5

1.2.2: Exit Slip Name:__________________ a.Which pile has more pennies? How do you know?
1-61. Cody and Jett each have a handful of pennies. Cody has arranged his pennies into 3 sets of 16, and has 9 leftover pennies. Jett has 6 sets of 9 pennies, and 4 leftover pennies. Each student thinks he has the most pennies.

a.Which student has more pennies? By how much? How did you figure this out?

b. Draw a diagram in your notebook and write an expression with numbers that represent the way Cody could have arranged his pennies (3 sets of 16 with 9 leftover pennies). Expression: ___________________________________________________ Now do the same for Jetts pennies (6 sets of 9 pennies with 4 leftover pennies). Expression:___________________________________________________ Can you find more than one way to arrange the pennies? c. Compare results with your team. How many different ways did your team find to represent the number of pennies with diagrams and number expressions?

____________________ With your team, decide which arrangements best represent the groups of pennies held by Cody and Jett. Copy the different number expressions for each student from your team to your paper.
d. Jett decided to rearrange all of his pennies into groups of 10, even though one group will not be complete. How many groups can he make?________ How can he represent his new grouping with a number expression?

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

____________________________________________________________

1-62. The figure at right is reprinted from problem 1-18. a.Working alone or with a partner, write as many number expressions as you can to describe the number and organization of dots in this figure. How many different ways can you see the pattern?

Describe two things you learned today:

b.Now compare number expressions with the rest of your team. Are some easier to match to the diagram than others? Why?

As a team, choose two number expressions that represent the dots in the figure in very different ways. Be sure that everyone has these two expressions written on their own papers.

Expression 1:

Expression 2:

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

c.Find the value of both expressions. How do they compare? 1-63. Use the data from Lesson 1.2.1 to figure out which team received the greatest number of pennies, which received the least, and where your team was in comparison to the other teams. Write your answers and show your work in your notebook. aExpress each of your comparisons with a number or word sentence. For example, Team A might have written 5 sets of 25 pennies, or 5(25), while Team B might have written 5 sets of 17 pennies and 2, or 5(17) + 2 .To compare, you might write 5(25) > 5(17) + 2 or you might write 5 sets of 25 pennies is greater than 5 sets of 17 pennies with two more. b.Did any teams have the same number of pennies? If so, write and calculate the value of each teams number expressions to show that the values are the same. What symbol do we use to show that two values are the same? If no two values are the same, choose two teams whose numbers of pennies were close. For these two teams, write and calculate the value of their number expressions. What symbols can we use to show that one value is less than, or greater than, another value? c.Consider the teams that have the greatest and the least number of pennies. How many would one team have to give to the other so that both teams have the same amount? Show how you figured this out.

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did you participate and contribute to your team?


1 2 3 4 5

1.2.3: Exit Slip Name:__________________ Using your own ideas and your own words what is a: Prime number?

1-72. HOW MANY PENNIES? Use your notebook as needed to show your work Jenny, Ann, and Gigi each have between 10 and 50 pennies. Work with your team to figure out how many pennies each of them could have, based on the clues given below. Be ready to explain your thinking to the class. Note that there is more than one possible answer for each part. a.Jenny can arrange all of her pennies into a rectangular array that looks like a square. In other words, it has the same number of rows as columns.

Composite number?

How many pennies could Jenny have?__________________________________ b.Ann can arrange all of her pennies into five different rectangular arrays.

Even number?

Odd number?
How many pennies could Ann have?__________________________________ c.Whenever Gigi arranges her pennies into a rectangular array with more than one row or column, she has a remainder (some leftover pennies).

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

How many pennies could Gigi have?__________________________________

1-73. What can you learn about a number from its rectangular arrays? Consider this question as you answer the questions below. a.A number that can be arranged into more than one rectangular array, such as Anns in part (b) of problem 1-72, is called a composite number. List all composite numbers less than 15. __________________________________________________ b.Consider the number 17, which could be Gigis number. Seventeen pennies can be arranged into only one rectangular array:1 penny by 17 pennies. Any number, like 17, that can form only one rectangular array is called a prime number. Work with your team to find all prime numbers less than 25.

Describe two things you learned today:

__________________________________________________
1-74. Jenny, Ann, and Gigi were thinking about odd and even numbers. (When even numbers are divided by two, there is no remainder. When odd numbers are divided by two, there is a remainder of one.) Jenny said, Odd numbers cannot be formed into a perfect rectangle with two rows. Does that mean they are prime? Consider Jennys question with your team. Are all odd numbers prime? If so, explain how you know. If not, find a counterexample (in this case, a number that is odd but is not prime).

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did you participate and contribute to your team?


1 2 3 4 5

1.2.4: Exit Slip Name:__________________ In the space below, draw four different arrays you might find for the number 16:

1-84. Have you ever noticed how many patterns exist in a simple multiplication table? Get a Lesson 1.2.4 Resource Page from your teacher. Fill in the missing numbers to complete the table. Then, with your team, describe at least three ways that you used to figure out what the missing numbers were.
1. 2. 3. 1-85. Gloria was looking at the multiplication table and noticed a pattern. Look, she said to her team. All of the prime numbers show up only two times as products in the table, and they are always on the edges. Discuss Glorias observation with your team. Then choose one color to mark all of the prime numbers. Why does the placement of the prime numbers make sense?

1-86. Using the multiplication table, work with your team to find patterns, as described below. a.Glorias observation in problem 1-85 related to prime numbers. What other kinds of numbers do you know about? Work with your team to brainstorm a list of kinds of numbers you have discussed. (You may want to look back at Lesson 1.2.3 to refresh your memory.)

b.What patterns can you find in the locations of the numbers of each type? Be ready to explain your observations.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

c.Notice how often different types of numbers appear. Do you find any patterns that make sense? Explain.

1-87. Consider the number 36, which could have been Anns number in part (b) of problem 1-72. a.Choose a new color and mark every 36 that appears in the table. b.Imagine that more rows and columns are added to the multiplication table until it is as big as your classroom floor. Would 36 appear more times in this larger table? If so, how many more times and where? If not, how can you be sure?

Describe two things you learned today:

c.List all of the factor pairs of 36. (A factor pair is a pair of numbers that multiply to give a particular product. For example, 2 and 10 make up a factor pair of 20, because 2 !10 = 20 .) How do the factor pairs of 36 relate to where it is found in the table? What does each factor pair tell you about the possible rectangular arrays for 36?

1-88. What does the frequency (the number of times an item appears) of a number in the table tell you about the rectangular arrays that are possible for that number? a.Gloria noticed that the number 12 appears as a product 6 times in the table. She wonders,Shouldnt there be 6 different rectangular arrays for 12? What do you think? Work with your team to draw all of the different rectangular arrays for 12 in your notebook and explain how they relate to the table.

b.How many rectangular arrays does the number 48 have? How many times would it appear as a product in a table as big as the classroom? Is there a relationship between these answers?
c.How many rectangular arrays does the number 36 have?_________ How many times would it appear as a product in a table as big as the room? Does the pattern you noticed for 12 and 48 apply to 36? If so, why does this make sense? If not, why is 36 different?

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

1-89. WHY DOES IT WORK? Work with your team to analyze an interesting pattern in the multiplication table. (See booklet) a.What is the pattern? Work with your team to test enough examples to be convinced about whether there is a consistent pattern.

How well did you participate and contribute to your team?


1 2 3 4 5

1.3.1: Exit Slip Name:__________________

1-99. USEFUL FORMS OF DATA In the Handful of Pennies activity (problem 1-51), you saw that it is possible to organize items in a way that communicates information at a glance. Instead of organizing pennies, you now have a long list of times to organize. a. How could you rearrange your list so that it is easier to find specific values? As a class, brainstorm ways to organize the data. Decide together how to rewrite the list.

LEARNING LOG In your notebook, explain how a stemand-leaf plot is organized and what it helps show about the data. Title this entry Stem-and-Leaf Plots and label it with todays date.

b. One way to organize and display data is in a stem-and- leaf plot. The example of a stem-and-leaf plot at right represents the data 31, 31, 43, 47, 61, 66, 68, and 70.
Think about how this plot is arranged and describe what you notice. For example, how would 42 be added to this plot? What about 102? Why do you think the space to the right of the 5 is blank? c.Once the stem-and-leaf plot makes sense, work together to organize your class data from problem 1-98 in a similar way in your notebook. d. What do you notice about the class data? Discuss this with your team and then write down three observations you can make. Be ready to share your observations with the class and explain how you made them. 1.

2.

3.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

1-100. CREATING A HISTOGRAM Another graph of data similar to a stem-and-leaf plot is called a histogram. (You may remember creating a histogram of birthdays in the very first lesson of this course.) This type of graph helps you learn how many pieces of data fall between different intervals, such as between 0 and 10 seconds. a.Following the directions of your teacher, place a sticky note with your time from problem 1-98 on the class histogram. b.Examine the graphed data. What statements can you make that describe how your class performed in the experiment?

Describe two things you learned today:

Were most students able to make a good estimate of 60 seconds? How can you tell?

How productive was your group today?


c.What if the histogram is formed in intervals of 20 seconds, so it has five columns instead(019, 2039, 4059, 6079, and 8099)? What would be the same or different about this graph?

Would it affect how you describe the performance of your class in the experiment?

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

What if it was formed using intervals of 5 seconds? How would this change things?

d.Compare the histogram with the stem-and-leaf plot you created in problem 1-99. What connections can you make between the two representations?

How well did you participate and contribute to your team?


1 2 3 4 5

How are these representations the same or different? Explain.

1.3.2: Exit Slip Name:__________________


1-107. TAKING A CENSUS, Part One Every ten years, the United States government performs a census, which is a collection of data that describes the people living in the country. With this massive undertaking, the government strives to learn many things about the people living in the United States, such as how the population is changing, where people live, what structures of families exist, and what languages are spoken. For example, in the year 2000, there were 281,421,906 people surveyed for the census, roughly 8,000,000 of whom lived in New York, NY. What is the size of a typical family for the students in your math class? Your task: Obtain one sticky note for each person in your team. On your sticky note, write down the number of people in your immediate family and place your sticky note above the appropriate number on the class bar graph. Then work with your class to consider the following questions: What is the difference between the largest and smallest piece of data in your class? This difference is called the range.

What number falls right in the middle of all the class data when the data is sorted in order? This number is called the median.

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.


What number is repeated most in the class data? This number is called the mode.

1-108. WHAT IS AVERAGE? Now obtain one cube (or other manipulative) from your teacher to represent each person in your family. a.Work with your classmates to organize yourselves into a human bar graph. b.If the cubes were redistributed so that everyone in the class had the same number, how many cubes would each person have? This is called the mean (or the average) of the data.

Describe two things you learned today:

How productive was your group today?

How well did your group work together as a team? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did you participate and contribute to your team? 1 2 3 4 5

1.3.3: Exit Slip Name:__________________


1-115. ESTIMATING 60 SECONDS AGAIN Today your class will try to improve its estimation of 60 seconds by doing the experiment again. a.Examine the data from the first experiment, collected in Lesson 1.3.1. Does the data accurately describe the ability to estimate 60 seconds by your class? What might cause the data to be inaccurate? b. What might help members of your class estimate 60 seconds more accurately? Share your ideas with the class and list them in your notebook. c. As you did before, close your eyes when your teacher tells you to start estimating. When you think 60 seconds have passed, open your eyes and record your time on your paper. 10-116. ANALYZING THE DATA Share your data with the class to form a new set of data. a.Examine the set of data. How did your class do? How could you tell if your class did a better job at estimating 60 seconds?

LEARNING LOG In your notebook, explain how to find the mean, median, mode, and range of a set of data. Title this entry Finding Mean, Median, Mode, and Range and label it with todays date.

b.If you have not already done so, create a histogram for this new set of data in your notebook and compare it to the histogram created in Lesson 1.3.1. According to what you see in the histograms, how is the new set of data the same or different than the original data? Explain why you think this and write this on your paper.

c.If you have not already done so, create a stem-and-leaf plot for the new set of data in your notebook. According to the stem-and-leaf plots, how is the new set of data the same or different than the original data? Explain.
10-117. CREATING A DOUBLE STEM-AND-LEAF PLOT A double stem-and-leaf plot has three columns with the stems in the middle column and the leaves of one team to the right of the stem and the leaves of the other to the left. For example if a student on one team had a value of 40, you would enter a 0 (the leaf) in the left-hand column next to the number 4 (the stem).

Circle one of the following to show your understanding of todays lesson.

a.What are the data values for each of the two teams?

b. As you look at the 60-second data for the two class experiments in the double stem-and-leaf, what do you notice about the two sets of data? Discuss this with your team and then write down three observations you can make. Be ready to explain your observations to the class.

1-118. Find the range and the mode for each set of data from your two 60-second experiments. Then find the median for each of them using either the double stem-and-leaf plot or the histograms. a.Write down these results.

What is something you GOT today that you feel really comfortable with or good about?

1.3.2 Range____________ Mode ______________ Median _______________

1.3.3 Range____________ Mode ______________ Median _______________ b.Compare the range, mode, and median of the two sets of data. What do you notice? Discuss this with your team and then write down three observations you can make. Be ready to explain your observations to the class.

What is something you feel like you still NEED to know in order to understand this better?

1.
2. 3. 1-119. COMPUTING THE MEAN use notebook as needed In problem 1-108, you found the mean number of cubes in the class by sharing cubes fairly among all students. How can this method translate into a mathematical strategy? One way to share cubes evenly would be for all of the students to put their cubes together into one big pile and then to redistribute all the cubes in the pile evenly among the students. a.How could you use numbers and symbols to represent what happens when everyone puts all of their cubes together? b.How could you use numbers and symbols to represent what happens when the big pile is distributed evenly among all of the people? c.As you have discovered, one way to calculate the mean for a set of data is to add all of the data together (like combining all of the cubes) and then divide by the number of pieces of data (like distributing the cubes evenly among all of the people). Calculate the mean for todays 60-second data. Be sure to record your work carefully. d.Now calculate the mean of the data you collected in the first 60-second experiment.

PARKING LOT (any questions???):

How productive was your group today? 1 2 3 4 5

How well did your group work together as a team?


1 2 3 4 5

How well did you participate and contribute to your team? 1 2 3 4 5

e.How do the two means compare? What does this tell you about the results of the two experiments? Be ready to explain your ideas to the class.