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APPENDICITIS

WHAT IS APPENDICITIS?
Appendicitis

is a painful swelling and infection of the appendix.

WHAT IS THE APPENDIX?


A

fingerlike pouch attached to the large intestine and located in the lower right area of the abdomen. The inside of the appendix is called the appendiceal lumen. Mucus created by the appendix travels through the appendiceal lumen and empties into the large intestine.

WHAT CAUSES APPENDICITIS?

Obstruction of the appendiceal lumen causes appendicitis. Mucus backs up in the appendiceal lumen, causing bacteria that normally live inside the appendix to multiply. As a result, the appendix swells and becomes infected. Sources of obstruction include feces, parasites, or growths that clog the appendiceal lumen enlarged lymph tissue in the wall of the appendix, caused by infection in the gastrointestinal tract or elsewhere in the body inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis trauma to the abdomen An inflamed appendix will likely burst if not removed. Bursting spreads infection throughout the abdomena potentially dangerous condition called peritonitis.

WHO GETS APPENDICITIS?


Anyone

can get appendicitis, but it is more common among people 10 to 30 years old. Appendicitis leads to more emergency abdominal surgeries than any other cause.

Acute appendicitis is a common and serious condition that requires immediate surgery for treatment. In acute appendicitis, the appendix swells and begins to fill with rapidly growing bacteria and pus. This results in the hallmark symptoms of acute appendicitis including pain in the right lower area of the abdomen and fever.

Chronic

appendicitis is rare and not

only that, it is slower in its progress and has less intense, even significant signs and symptoms. A partial obstruction of the appendix and milder bacterial infection are the main components in the chronic appendicitis making it important symptoms of chronic appendicitis. Chronic appendicitis is attributed a grave nature in spite of its slow progress pattern.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF APPENDICITIS?


Abdominal pain is the main symptom. The abdominal pain usually occurs suddenly, often causing a person to wake up at night occurs before other symptoms begins near the belly button and then moves lower and to the right is new and unlike any pain felt before gets worse in a matter of hours gets worse when moving around, taking deep breaths, coughing, or sneezing

Other symptoms of appendicitis may include loss of appetite nausea vomiting constipation or diarrhea inability to pass gas a low-grade fever that follows other symptoms abdominal swelling the feeling that passing stool will relieve discomfort

Symptoms vary and can mimic other sources of abdominal pain, including intestinal obstruction inflammatory bowel disease pelvic inflammatory disease and other gynecological disorders intestinal adhesions constipation

HOW IS APPENDICITIS DIAGNOSED?


Medical

History Physical Examination


Guarding. Rebound tenderness Rovsing's sign. Psoas sign. Obturator sign

Laboratory Tests Imaging Tests

HOW IS APPENDICITIS TREATED?


Surgery ( Appendectomy) Pain Management Pain from appendicitis can be severe. Strong (i.e., narcotic) pain medications are recommended for pain management prior to surgery. Morphine is generally the standard of care in adults and children in the treatment of pain from appendicitis prior to surgery but not prior to physical examination. Nonsurgical Treatment

Antibiotics and soft low fiber diet

Recovery

Patients are recommended to sit up on the edge of the bed and walk short distances for several times a day. Moving is mandatory and pain medication may be given if necessary. Full recovery from appendectomies takes about four to six weeks, but can be prolonged to up to eight weeks if the appendix had ruptured.